Write Anywhere #25

This week I decided to go somewhere that isn’t too unusual or exotic. You might go there yourself this week. The destination was ordinary, but the experience was most definitely not usual.

Write Anywhere #25: The Mall

image courtesy Terrence, Creative Commons

I am not a recreational shopper. I don’t really like crowds. But there’s one benefit of the mall for me. People watching. This visit I walked past a flock of skinny-jeaned young moms pushing strollers, senior power walkers, and a herd of young teens thundering towards the Apple store.

The food court offered a wonderful chance to hear bits of dialogue in more languages than I understand. And the best study of all was the uncomfortable feeling that tried to bloom into paranoia when I realized someone was watching me. A middle-aged man sat at a table directly in front of me. I looked at him and he stared back, never blinking. He watched me write and eat my food court Indian meal. He wasn’t eating, or watching the music videos on the big screen tvs, or watching anyone else. I thought maybe I smeared the palak paneer on my face or that he was having a bad day. This went on for twenty minutes. He also had an uncanny resemblance to a famous serial killer.

Don’t worry, my imagination magnified it all, but it was unnerving nonetheless. If I want to write about a creepy incident, I might have a little fuel for some ideas.  Every writer should be a professional people watcher. People-watching can give you bits and pieces that can spark an idea that will grow into a poem, story or maybe the Great American Novel. Looking for those bits and pieces that become ideas is what Twyla Thorp, in her book ‘The Creative Habit’ calls “scratching”:

“You can’t just dance or paint or write or sculpt. Those are just verbs. You need a tangible idea to get you going. The idea, however miniscule, is what turns the verb into a noun – paint into a painting, sculpt into a sculpture, write into writing, dance into a dance.” – Twyla Thorp, The Creative Habit

Even though Tharpe is a choreographer, it’s not a dance book. She covers universal themes relative to all creatives. I’m in the midst of her book, and it’s really inspiring. I highly recommend it.

Where did you write this week?

Question: What’s your favorite mall store?

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7 thoughts on “Write Anywhere #25

  1. Heather Jenkins

    He was Kristin-watching. Dun dun dun…
    Favorite store in the mall? That would mean I would actually have to GO to the mall, right? Does the Barnes and Noble across from the mall count? My favorite store used to be Origins, but they closed and now Dillard’s offers a tiny section “dedicated” to Origins. Department stores make me itch.
    So was the mall as interesting as the Waffle House? :)

    Reply
  2. sllynn

    It is my belief that local malls are portals to Hell, in which thousands of demons pour out of the cracks between The Gap and Victoria’s Secret. I’m sure your stalker was one of those….. ;)

    Reply
  3. Rhonda Hopkins

    I hate the mall! Ugh! HOWEVER, it is a great place to people watch. So when I’m forced to go there with someone else, that’s what I do. How creeped out you must have been having that guy just staring at you like that. But you’re right…you now have fodder for a scene in a book. I’ve gotten lots of inspiration watching people and letting my imagination flow. Have a great weekend!

    Reply
  4. Jackie King

    I kinda like malls, but never have time to go. I also, like to people watch, but would hate it if someone started watching me. The man in the food court sounds scary.

    Reply
  5. Kate MacNicol

    Oh yuck Kristin. That guy just sounds too creepy and he probably enjoyed the fact that he knew you knew he was staring. *shudders*

    The mall is good for snippets of dialogue, clothing and characterization. Maybe even villains. Thanks!

    Reply
  6. Diana Douglas

    Pretty creepy. At least he didn’t follow you home.
    When I was a teenager, my dad would take my mother and me to the mall and then wait for us in the food court while we shopped. He would pretend to read whatever paperback he had at the time and then people watch. It was always fun to hear what he had to report on the way home.

    Reply

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